The Government Computing BT Awards for Innovation 2005 have just been announced.  Using your skill and ingenuity – and without cheating by looking it up – answer the following questions:

  • Which DWP project would you see as one of the leading contenders for the ‘best project – government to government’ award?
  • Which DWP project might have won the ‘best project – government to business’ award?
  • Why are these projects effectively invisible?

Answers behind the link below   

Which DWP project would you see as one of the leading contenders for the ‘best project – government to government’ award?

  • e-NIRS Access for Jobcentre Plus

Which DWP project might have won the ‘best project – government to business’ award?

  • CRU Electronic Business Links
    A scheme from the Compensation Recovery
    Unit of the Department for Work and Pensions to improve communication
    with the insurance industry on compensation payments. It impressed the
    judges with its scale and complexity, reducing the pressure of manual
    work, improved the integrity of data and greatly shortened the time
    taken to respond to customers

Why are these projects effectively invisible?

  • Good question

Full list of winners and runners up here.

Comments

  1. Sorry, cheated as have already seen the awards but same sentiments applied – especially as John B says that the CRU project is well rehearsed in award acceptance speeches.
    Also of interest to us is the Achievement Award which went to:
    Geoff Young, e-services director, Woking BC
    Chris Eele, manager, Woking Citizens Advice Bureau
    Leaders of Woking’s initiative to develop the CAB as a trusted intermediary in delivering services to vulnerable citizens. Geoff and Chris have broken new ground in increasing the role of the voluntary sector in the provision of services. They acknowledged Citizens Advice as a trusted intermediary and gave CAB staff access to the council’s back office systems, such as housing, council tax benefits and community legal services in order to help clients – often the most vulnerable in society – get effective help.
    which is interesting mainly because it is something CAB have DONE rather than talked about Suggests that we might like to focus some of our future conversations with them at a local level (building on existing initiatives) rather than the national all or nothing approach.

  2. I spotted Woking too – but to be fair to the national CAB people, they talk a lot about Woking as a pioneer of what ought to be done. No doubt worth talking to them locally (and I have a vague recollection that JCP has had some local involvement) – but their central-field lines of communication probably aren’t as bad as ours.

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